overlypolitebisexual:

cat people: dogs are cool too
dog people: cats don’t feel love did you know a cat once MURDERED my MOTHER

(via ondoki)

awwww-cute:

Lazy record store employee

awwww-cute:

Lazy record store employee

(via unimpressedcats)

bellfry:

cosmic-llin:

undie-fan-99:

My fellow Trekkies will understand the reference.

Excuse you?
OK, so, in Generations, Deanna takes the helm at short notice and ably executes evasive and targeting manoeuvres during a battle with a Klingon ship, which the Enterprise WINS in part due to her piloting skill, even though piloting is not her main job. THEN she prepares for and executes a successful starship separation, while simultaneously overseeing the evacuation of the crew to the saucer section. She pilots the saucer to a safe distance so that it isn’t destroyed by the explosion of the drive section, thereby saving the lives of everyone on the ship.
Helm controls go offline immediately following the saucer separation - Deanna has no control over the ship during the crash. The best pilot in Starfleet couldn’t have done any better. 
In Nemesis, Captain Picard ORDERS Deanna to ram the Scimitar and she does an EXCELLENT job of it. If, say, Data had done this, we’d be celebrating it as a crowning moment of badass.
I know this is just a joke and I know I have a bit of a sense of humour failure when it comes to Deanna, but come on. She gets enough stick as it is without her triumphs being misrepresented as failures.


Deanna did so well in command of the ship that it really made me wonder why they were wasting her as a counselor. Yes, she was a good counselor, but there was no reason she shouldn’t have been at the helm more often.

bellfry:

cosmic-llin:

undie-fan-99:

My fellow Trekkies will understand the reference.

Excuse you?

OK, so, in Generations, Deanna takes the helm at short notice and ably executes evasive and targeting manoeuvres during a battle with a Klingon ship, which the Enterprise WINS in part due to her piloting skill, even though piloting is not her main job. THEN she prepares for and executes a successful starship separation, while simultaneously overseeing the evacuation of the crew to the saucer section. She pilots the saucer to a safe distance so that it isn’t destroyed by the explosion of the drive section, thereby saving the lives of everyone on the ship.

Helm controls go offline immediately following the saucer separation - Deanna has no control over the ship during the crash. The best pilot in Starfleet couldn’t have done any better. 

In Nemesis, Captain Picard ORDERS Deanna to ram the Scimitar and she does an EXCELLENT job of it. If, say, Data had done this, we’d be celebrating it as a crowning moment of badass.

I know this is just a joke and I know I have a bit of a sense of humour failure when it comes to Deanna, but come on. She gets enough stick as it is without her triumphs being misrepresented as failures.

Deanna did so well in command of the ship that it really made me wonder why they were wasting her as a counselor. Yes, she was a good counselor, but there was no reason she shouldn’t have been at the helm more often.

thechamberofsecrets:

earlier today i was thinking about the thousands of girls who post videos on youtube reviewing makeup and talking about their fav products and making tutorials and how no girl has ever once done it just to impress men like literally that whole community exists just for girls because it’s something that so many of us enjoy and yet men still think that we wear makeup for them

(via spookygroohve)

(via bellfry)

jtotheizzoe:

How do we really know the Earth has a solid core? I mean, we can’t go down there, despite what Jules Verne would lead you to believe.
As I mentioned in my “Structure of the Earth” video this week on It’s Okay To Be Smart, Earth’s tendency to shake and rumble up here on the crust has allowed us to discover a lot about its inner structure.
Earthquakes don’t only send waves along Earth’s surface, they send certain kinds of waves (P-waves and S-waves) through the Earth itself which can even be read by seismic stations on the other side of the planet. These two kinds of waves interact with solids and liquids within the Earth, being refracted and/or blocked by certain liquid and solid phases, resulting in seismic shadow zones halfway around the globe. Study enough earthquakes in different places, and you can tell a lot about Earth’s interior.
That’s precisely what Dutch scientist Inge Lehmann did in the early 20th century. I strongly recommend heading over to Meg Rosenburg’s True Anomalies blog to read a very detailed history and explanation of how we discovered Earth’s core.
And if you missed it, here’s last week’s OKTBS video all about why the Earth has layers and how it got that way:

Bonus: You know how they say dogs and cats (and other animals) can sense earthquakes and other natural disasters? Here’s GIF proof, as a dog and cat get the hell outta Dodge right before a quake hits:

jtotheizzoe:

How do we really know the Earth has a solid core? I mean, we can’t go down there, despite what Jules Verne would lead you to believe.

As I mentioned in my “Structure of the Earth” video this week on It’s Okay To Be Smart, Earth’s tendency to shake and rumble up here on the crust has allowed us to discover a lot about its inner structure.

Earthquakes don’t only send waves along Earth’s surface, they send certain kinds of waves (P-waves and S-waves) through the Earth itself which can even be read by seismic stations on the other side of the planet. These two kinds of waves interact with solids and liquids within the Earth, being refracted and/or blocked by certain liquid and solid phases, resulting in seismic shadow zones halfway around the globe. Study enough earthquakes in different places, and you can tell a lot about Earth’s interior.

That’s precisely what Dutch scientist Inge Lehmann did in the early 20th century. I strongly recommend heading over to Meg Rosenburg’s True Anomalies blog to read a very detailed history and explanation of how we discovered Earth’s core.

And if you missed it, here’s last week’s OKTBS video all about why the Earth has layers and how it got that way:

Bonus: You know how they say dogs and cats (and other animals) can sense earthquakes and other natural disasters? Here’s GIF proof, as a dog and cat get the hell outta Dodge right before a quake hits:

sans soleil (chris marker, 1983)

(via holyonekt)

You have to be odd to be number one.

Dr. Seuss

This changed me

(via reveriesofawriter)

(via holyonekt)

If they can learn to say Tchaikovsky and Michelangelo and Dostoyevsky, they can learn to say Uzoamaka. — Uzo Aduba’s mother proving that the idea of not being able to pronounce a POC’s name because it’s “too hard” or “too complicated” is complete bullshit and actually just laziness. (via cosmicspread)

(via staggeringheights)

tamorapierce:

borderlineotaku:

whatalansays:

blackcaliente:

i guess you could call this
a moist owlet

…I’m so done with this site.

It’s such an aggressive and in your face water dance

I’m singin in the rain/Just singin in the rain/what a glorious feeling/I’m happy again

tamorapierce:

borderlineotaku:

whatalansays:

blackcaliente:

i guess you could call this

a moist owlet

…I’m so done with this site.

It’s such an aggressive and in your face water dance

I’m singin in the rain/Just singin in the rain/what a glorious feeling/I’m happy again

(via nutuition)

onemultiplefandom:

bitchesaloud:

plot twist

THIS WAS THE CUTEST PLOT TWIST EVER

(via nutuition)

(via xoshygirl)

regenderate:

hiram-mcdaniels-for-mayor:

jaclcfrost:

let’s play Did I Always Have That Personality Trait Or Did I Absorb It From A Character?

Bonus round: wait one fucking second isn’t that something my friend says and now I’m saying it too

and then there’s my favorite: Did I Get That From My Friend Or Did They Get It From Me?

(via nutuition)